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Use of new technology for rural roads

The state government is seriously contemplating to construct roads in rural areas using Jute Geotextile Engineering method
Use of new technology for rural roads

The state government is seriously contemplating to construct roads in rural areas using Jute Geotextile Engineering method, which is not only cost-effective but also eco-friendly and gives strength to roads.

State rural works department minister Shrawan Kumar, while inaugurating a workshop on the use of jute geotextile in rural roads said that use of jute textile would prove a milestone as it would help in renovating the existing roads. The technology is also effective in giving strength to embankments and slopes of a mountain.

Kumar said the biggest advantage of jute geotextile is its easy availability and economical prices compared to synthetic and natural substitutes. Besides, it can be tailor-made as per the end users’ technical requirement like tensile strength and other parameters.

Further, biodegradability of jute geotextile after it has achieved its purpose is its greatest advantage. In view of the global concerns for environment, jute geotextile technology becomes a natural choice for policymakers.

The minister said a team of engineers would soon be sent to other states, including West Bengal, Assam, Karnataka, Tripura and Meghalaya, to acquire technical know-how and assess how successful it is. This technology is primarily used for rural roads. Since large funds are being spent on Prime Minister Gram Sadak Yojana (PMGSY), the technology would be helpful in curtailing cost.

Rural works department’s executive engineer Subhash Chandra said National Jute Board is a technology provider, covering areas like designing, providing quality assurance and guidance in installation of jute geotextile. He said the department owned 1,22,598km road in the state, which accounts for 87% of total road length in Bihar. "We have already constructed 48,100km roads under PMGSY and work is on for another 25,300km roads," he said.

Shubh Kirti Mazumdar, a retired IAS officer of Bihar cadre and currently Director General, Indian Jute Mill Association, said the state would benefit by applying jute technology, specially in Rohtas district where illegal miners hold sway at the cost of environment. Jute commissioner, National Jute Board, Subrata Gupta, and director, India Jute Industries Research Association, U S Sharma were among those present on the occasion.

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