Education

Rural libraries are getting technology orientated

Libraries are becoming places where people go to use a 3-D printer, die-cut machine, canning maker or sewing machine
Rural libraries are getting technology orientated

Libraries have been an very important medium for education in rural areas.The students and researches in several rural parts go to library on a regular basis as its the cheapest form of gathering information.Most rural villages are developing libraries with more equipped tools.

Therefore now libraries are also becoming places where people go to use a 3-D printer, die-cut machine, canning maker or sewing machine.

Providing places where people have access to technology is referred to as a makerspace, and these spaces are popping up in libraries throughout the country.

In addition to the library in Fremont, libraries in Clintonville, Manawa, Marion, New London and Scandinavia also received funding.“We are going to share our makerbox with the other libraries that got the grant,” she said.

“It cuts through 60 different kinds of material, from paper to leather,” Frick said. “The technology part is it’s tied to technology via Bluetooth with an iPad.”

The library has a subscription to a design center, which offers close to 25,000 different projects.
That subscription is free to library patrons, which means they are able to choose a project on the iPad and then follow the step-by-step instructions on it.

With the help of an iPad, people may choose from among thousands of designs to create something like that at Fremont’s Neuschafer Community Library. Angie Landsverk Photo
Sharon Wilson works at Fremont’s library and has been experimenting with the technology.
 

- Advertisement -
The Changing Face of Rural India