Agriculture

New CPR device changing rural medicine for the better

A new CPR device is changing rural medicine in North Dakota, by saving more lives.
New CPR device changing rural medicine for the better

Chuck Baskerville, Paramedic, Altru Hospital: “It does CPR like I can’t do.” Through the Helmsley Charitable Trust, millions in grant funding was distributed to the state health departments of Minnesota, North and South Dakota. Part of that was designated for North Dakota to receive over 200 LUCAS devices, 5 of which came to Altru Hospital in Grand Forks.

Baskerville said , “This device is going to be used when a person, an adult or older child is in cardiac arrest.”

The LUCAS device is lightweight, portable, runs off a battery and the best part, it’s hands free. Baskerville adds, “It can free up some other hands, because while I have a team working on that patient, whereas it might have taken four or five people to effectively resuscitate now it can be done with several less.”

Medical workers say the effectiveness of manual CPR drops after one minute since a person can get tired and start to lose energy. The technology can also be applied to a patient in less than a minute.

While it’s ideal to be used with a few paramedics, it can be used with one Art Culver, a manager for Altru Ambulance Services, tells us how in a nearby town one paramedic operated the LUCAS device solo on his team member, while they were on a 911 call.

Art Culver, manager for Altru Ambulance Services said,”And currently he is still working as a paramedic, the LUCAS device saved him.”

A statewide study is being conducted by professionals at UND to determine how life-saving this device is, but emergency responders say they are already seeing positive results.Chuck Baskerville, Paramedic, Altru Hospital: “It does CPR like I can’t do.” Through the Helmsley Charitable Trust, millions in grant funding was distributed to the state health departments of Minnesota, North and South Dakota. Part of that was designated for North Dakota to receive over 200 LUCAS devices, 5 of which came to Altru Hospital in Grand Forks.

Baskerville said , “This device is going to be used when a person, an adult or older child is in cardiac arrest.”

The LUCAS device is lightweight, portable, runs off a battery and the best part, it’s hands free. Baskerville adds, “It can free up some other hands, because while I have a team working on that patient, whereas it might have taken four or five people to effectively resuscitate now it can be done with several less.”

Medical workers say the effectiveness of manual CPR drops after one minute since a person can get tired and start to lose energy. The technology can also be applied to a patient in less than a minute.

While it’s ideal to be used with a few paramedics, it can be used with one Art Culver, a manager for Altru Ambulance Services, tells us how in a nearby town one paramedic operated the LUCAS device solo on his team member, while they were on a 911 call.

Art Culver, manager for Altru Ambulance Services said,”And currently he is still working as a paramedic, the LUCAS device saved him.”

A statewide study is being conducted by professionals at UND to determine how life-saving this device is, but emergency responders say they are already seeing positive results.

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