rural
Agriculture

High-resolution spatial maps to assess farmlands for insurance claims

The three unique geographical maps would evaluate crop kinds or crop dominance, cropping intensity, or the number of times a crop is planted on the same plot of land in a year, as well as irrigated versus rainfed croplands
High-resolution spatial maps to assess farmlands for insurance claims
High-resolution spatial maps to assess farmlands for insurance claims

High-resolution spatial maps have been developed by ICRISAT (International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics) scientists in partnership with the Asian Development Bank (ADB) to enable cropland mapping for insurance claims and agricultural policy decision-making that focuses on regenerative agriculture (RA).

Highlighting the development, Dr Arvind Kumar, Deputy Director General, Research, ICRISAT, said, “One of the global markets with the greatest growth is agricultural insurance. Stabilising agricultural revenues through insurance payouts can help farmers cope with crop loss and decrease poverty. A quicker and more effective technique for assisting those who develop farm policy is spatial mapping.”

Validating the effects of floods and droughts often necessitates an army of surveyors, which is a lengthy process. In order to evaluate croplands, crop types, and crop intensity data for South Asia, ICRISAT scientists worked with the ADB to create spatial maps of the region. Nearly 25 per cent of the world’s population, or 1.9 billion people, live in South Asia, 87 per cent of whom are smallholder farmers.

For the claims process to be more accurate and effective, insurance firms and governmental organisations need high-quality satellite imagery to track and map floods, droughts, and other climatic events.

Dr ML Jat, Research Program Director, Resilient Farm and Food Systems, ICRISAT, “Spatial maps can be utilised as potential tools to target regenerative agriculture in addition to crop insurance. Crop type mapping can also help determine the best systems and locations for the deployment of regenerative agriculture.”

The breakthrough

To do this, scientists from ICRISAT have created three unique spatial maps for South Asia with a spatial resolution of 30 m, which is significantly greater to get finer details of farmland for evaluations of food and water security. Currently, data from remote sensing with a coarse resolution (250–1000 m) is used to analyse these parameters.

Highlighting the significance of high-resolution spatial data, Murali Krishna Gumma, Principal Scientist and Cluster Leader – Geospatial Sciences and Big Data at ICRISAT, “With approximately two billion inhabitants and 230 million hectares of net agriculture, South Asia may assess, model, map, and monitor its crops using the high spatial resolution data. The information would then be used to create a number of development models for precise monitoring and decision-making for the entire region.”

For the years 2014–2015, the team created three spatial maps for South Asia to enhance the management and assessment of the region’s food and water security. The three unique geographical maps would evaluate crop kinds or crop dominance, cropping intensity, or the number of times a crop is planted on the same plot of land in a year, as well as irrigated versus rainfed croplands.

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