CSR

B-models for start-ups in farm industry with 15 percent innovation programmes

Experts suggest that India's agricultural exports can be doubled to $80 billion and that the increased output can be produced by fewer, better-trained farm workers.
B-models for start-ups in farm industry with 15 percent innovation programmes

Many start-ups have been introduced in the recent times in the farming industry. Yet, a question arises if these companies have proper B-models.Even though technologies and innovation are growing substantially high in farming industries, the right application is found.

Agri-business are hugely paying prices for their application and procedure set-ups. However, policy-makers seem interested in lofty programmes, with little reference to the farming sector. Logically, Digital India should connect progressive farmers through smartphones; agriculture should be a Make in India candidate because it delivers 15 per cent of India’s exports, valued at $ 40 billion; it should be a National Skills Development Mission candidate because it employs 260 million people – over half of India’s workforce. Experts suggest that India’s agricultural exports can be doubled to $80 billion and that the increased output can be produced by fewer, better-trained farm workers.

Concerns have been raised for increase in price rates which are heavily disturbing the consumers. In a recent rise in pulses rates pointed out question towards the reserach team.In this regards, Narendra Pratap Singh, director of the Indian Institute of Pulses Research, Kanpur, said: "It is not lack of research as much as policy support that is currently missing in pulses." The message from the senior scientist seems to be, ‘The pulses problem is not because of us scientists; the problem is with regard to policy and interdepartmental coordination’. Truth be told, apart from technology, the business model (way of doing things) can be a huge source of innovation. Farming and agriculture are crying out for a business model innovation.

So what is the farming problem? Is India short of good farmers, funds, schemes or experts? None of them. In fact, it has too much of these valuable resources, but they work in an uncoordinated and unfocused manner. As pointed out in a recent book (The Silo Effect by Gillian Tett, Little Brown, 2015), "Silos are cultural phenomena… They arise because social groups have particular conventions about how to classify the world… People tend to assume that their way of behaving is natural and the way other people behave is not… Occasionally we can imagine a different way of organising our world".

Farming and agriculture need an alternative national framework. If you search for an explicit National Agricultural Policy, similar to India’s Industrial Policy Resolution of the 1950s, you will encounter a strange phenomenon: the present National Democratic Alliance government may mention a 2005 United Progressive Alliance draft, which anyway needs updating. 

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